Thursday, March 16, 2017

Having Fun with Color Cards

It started innocently enough. I had dozens of ultra fine point Sharpie markers and a cute little pad of 4x6 watercolor sheets. So naturally, I just had to see what I could make with them! Below are some of the results.

I made these with the idea of trying out different color combinations just to see how well different colors worked together. My thought was to use them as color reference cards for future works.

©2017 Lynn Edwards

©2017 Lynn Edwards

©2017 Lynn Edwards

©2017 Lynn Edwards
©2017 Lynn Edwards

This little exercise yielded some pleasant surprises. For example, the last card had colors in it that bore no relation to the other colors whatsoever. It's the only card in the bunch where I used some new gel pens in addition to the Sharpies. I was trying out these gel pens for the first time, pulling colors from the pack of 24 willy nilly just to see how they looked and performed on paper.

Normally I wouldn't use pale yellow, copper, ultramarine blue, purple, baby blue, orange, dark teal, peach and mint green together in a million years. But when these unlikely hues were thrown together, as shown here, this offbeat "soup"somehow worked. Now I'm thinking I might try choosing colors blindfolded just to see how many more weird but viable pairings I can come up with. If they look good together in a 4x6 inch format, it will be fun to try them out on a much larger scale. So stay tuned, more adventure lies ahead! And if you've experimented with unusual color combinations, I'd love to hear what you did and what the results were.

Text and images ©2017 Lynn Edwards





Friday, March 10, 2017

Where am I??

Well, I admit I have not been posting much the past few weeks. It's because I'm working like crazy trying to finish pieces for several upcoming juried shows, and re-arranging my studio to accommodate my huge wooden easel which has, up until now, gotten very little use because it takes up so much floor space. I'm also working on a project for a local non-profit, and preparing to return to teaching some workshops this summer, along with developing a new series of paintings I'm really excited about. In between these things I'm continuing to plug away at increasing my Etsy listings. These are advancing at a snail's pace because I find doing the photography (5 shots of each item, with just 83 items to go) maddeningly tedious. So. Contrary to rumors, I have not relocated to Monaco, nor have I run away to join the circus. Nope, right now I'm just up to my neck in alligators. But the upside is that when I do come up for air, I'll have LOTS of photos and info to share. So please don't send out the bloodhounds...at least, not yet!

©2017 Lynn Edwards

A Thought for Sunday, March 12, 2017

"Only he who can see the invisible can do the impossible." -- Frank L. Gaines

Sunday, March 5, 2017

A Thought for Sunday, March 5, 2017

"Nothing is harder to topple than than a fact that supports a deeply held prejudice denied by its holder." -- Russell Ackoff

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Use Your Artwork to Make Bookmarks

Do you love to doodle? Sketch? Paint? Collage? Don't hide your artwork in a drawer or leave it in a sketchbook. Turn it into bookmarks!
 
Bookmarks make great gifts for anyone who loves to read. Electronic devices have wide appeal, but there are millions of us who still prefer the satisfaction of holding a real book in our hands. (Though I'd be lost without my Kindle.) Bookmarks are an especially nice add-on when you're giving a book to someone as a gift. Bookmarks make good gifts for students, teachers, tutors and librarians......and the more appealing and distinctive they are, the more they're appreciated. 

Here are some of the bookmarks I've made recently, which are offered for sale in my Etsy shop.

 


I create the artwork on 140# watercolor paper, which I then adhere to one or two layers of heavy card stock in colors that complement and enhance the art. Using a hole punch, I make an opening at one end and insert either a length of waxed linen thread or narrow ribbon. I tie a knot in the threads, slip beads onto the threads in colors that repeat those in the artwork, and tie another knot to keep the beads in place. Done!

A few hints:


Use acid free card stock rather than construction paper, which deteriorates quickly and fades even faster.

If desired, you can laminate the bookmarks before inserting the thread and beads.

Not counting the threads, my bookmarks range in size from roughly 6 3/4 x 1 3/4 to 7 x 2 1/4 inches but you can make them any size you want.

Caution! Do NOT give bookmarks with beads to children! Beads pose a choking hazard to young kids. For safety's sake, if you're making bookmarks for youngsters, eliminate the threads and beads altogether.

Text and images ©2017 Lynn Edwards

Sunday, February 26, 2017

A Thought for Sunday, February 26, 2017

"I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me." -- Fred Allen

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Image Transfers the Easy Way

Image transfers add so much to a work of art. Many of the collages and mixed media works I create have at least one, sometimes more. I've always made them the conventional way: print out the image using a laser printer, and apply several coats of gloss medium to the back, allowing each to dry completely before adding another coat over it. Then moisten the back of the image with water and rub...and rub...and rub....until all the little paper crumbles are removed.

Like Watching the Barn Roof Rust

What makes this process so time consuming and boring is the need to let each layer of medium dry in between applications. In my humid climate that can take most of an afternoon.

Newsflash: There is a better way! I stumbled upon it while re-reading Patti Brady's excellent book, Rethinking Acrylics:Radical Solutions for Exploiting the World's Most Versatile Medium (North Light Books).  Her method seriously reduces the amount of time it takes to obtain an image that's ready to use.

It's So Simple

Patti's secret? Use Clear Tar Gel to coat the back of the image. Just ONE coat is all you need! Make sure every part of the back is covered with the Tar Gel and that it's TOTALLY dry before you immerse the paper in clean water for a minute or two. Then proceed to rubbing...and rubbing....and rubbing...

Just to be safe, I let my Tar Gel-coated image dry overnight.

Why, oh why, did I not notice this gem of a tip earlier? (Like, years ago.) It really accelerates a tedious process and produces a nice, clear transfer. Thanks to Patti Brady, the time it takes to make an image transfer has been cut in half. Now, that's something to celebrate!

©2017 Lynn Edwards