Current Shows

CURRENT SHOWS

The Art House Gallery Small Works Show, 4425 Cherokee St., Acworth Ga. Nov. 2 -Dec. 21, 2019. This show features several of Lynn's paintings and mixed media pieces, as well as her mosaic pendants and hand painted necklace sets. Call 678-543-5777 for more information.

Douglas County Cultural Arts Council, 8652 Campbellton St., Douglasville Ga. Dec. 2-20, 2019. Lynn is very honored to have been chosen as the Council's Pop Up Artist for the month of December! Here you'll find her one-of-a-kind jewelry creations, paintings, handmade cards, collaged notebooks and much more, all ideal for holiday giving. 770-949-2877 for more info.

Holiday Gift Shop at the Rosenwald School, Cherokee St. across from Logan Park, Acworth Ga. Sat. Dec. 7 , 10 a.m.- 3 p.m. and Sun. Dec. 8, 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Come browse an amazing selection of handmade gifts and meet the 20 artists who made them. Shop for pottery, jewelry, home decor items, fine art, cards and stationery and so much more in the historic Rosenwald School!! Plenty of free parking. Call 678-543-5777 for more information.

Sunday, June 26, 2016

A Thought for Sunday, June 26, 2016

"The Infinite has written its name on the heavens in shining stars, and on the earth in tender flowers." -- Jean Paul Richter

Saturday, June 25, 2016

A Storage Solution for Small Leftover Paper Scraps

The smaller your paper scraps are, the harder it is to store them. They accumulate quickly; tossing them haphazardly into a box makes it nearly impossible to find a specific paper easily later on.

Here's the strategy that works for me: I now store leftover remnants from each collage, mixed media piece, or other project that I do in a single zip top food storage bag. (Every grocery store in America sells these bags in a number of sizes.)

I just grab a bag in the appropriate size and put all my scraps from that one project into it.

You'll notice each bag will tend to have a predominant color. If you group your collage papers by color, as I do, you'll find this makes assigning the bags to the right box or bin quite easy. Bagged, those pesky scraps are so much easier to handle and sort through. The next time you need a scrap from a particular project, or in a specific color, you'll be able to find what you need in just minutes.

©2016 Lynn Edwards

Sunday, June 19, 2016

A Thought for Sunday, June 19, 2016

"Touch the earth, love the earth, honour the earth, her plains, her valleys, her hills, and her seas; rest your spirit in her solitary places." -- Henry Beston

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Can't Miss Art Galleries In and Around Hilton Head, Part One

Much of the joy I get from traveling is visiting art galleries wherever I go. Being a working artist myself, doing "field research," as I like to call it, is not only good for keeping abreast of things in this profession, it's also just plain fun. So on our recent trip to Hilton Head Island, Hubs and I spent a couple of very pleasant afternoons wandering through several galleries on both the island itself and in the charming little town of Bluffton nearby.

Unfortunately, there simply wasn't time to visit all of the galleries in this beautiful coastal area, so there are a number of them that won't be mentioned here because we never got to them. (An excellent reason to make another trip to HHI!) So I'll just mention those we did visit, and what it was about each that appealed to me. In this post I'll cover the three galleries we visited on Hilton Head itself:

Smith Galleries

Smith, at 1000 William Hilton Parkway on Hilton Head, was our first stop. Located on the upper floor of Building J in the Village of Wexford, a lovely tree-shaded shopping center, it was a bit of a challenge to find. Once we did, it did not disappoint. Fine American craft is this gallery's specialty. There were so many unique and beautiful things on display I could see why my friend and fellow artist, Kathy Woodworth, had recommended that we seek it out. I was especially drawn to the hand blown glass pieces, whimsical clocks and, well, just about everything, including a very nice selection of fine art as well.

Nash Gallery


Another gallery that had been recommended to us was Nash Gallery at 13 Harbourside Lane in Shelter Cove Harbor, off William Hilton Parkway. Nash Gallery is easy to find: just look for the enormous statue of Poseidon as you enter the complex. The gallery is located directly across from the statue at street level.

This massive statue of Poseidon is just a few feet from the entrance to Nash Gallery. ©2016 Lynn Edwards


 Nash Gallery in Shelter Cove Harbor, where you can sit on the rocking chairs and gaze at the yachts in the adjacent marina.  ©2016 Lynn Edwards
 Like Smith Gallery, Nash carries many beautiful and beautifully-crafted items for the home, office and personal use.

I fell in love with the work of several of their potters, including that of Florida's Francine Zajac, whose Earthtones line includes, among many other things, soap dishes in the form of scallop shells. One of them was perfect for one of the bathrooms in our house so I couldn't resist it. Glazed in shades of blue-green with a touch of peachy-tan, it's a cherished reminder of our trip.  It also serves the practical function of holding the richly scented handmade soaps that I love so much, made by our friend John Kleinhans.

Besides the pottery, Hubs and I were both captivated by a display of wall art comprised of clay faces, each with its own individual "personality." Hubs really liked a face jauntily "smoking" a fat cigar, whose self-satisfied expression looked as if he'd just won a backroom poker game. That was but one piece in a collection sure to make anyone smile. In fact, it would be worth making a trip to Nash Gallery just to check out this display alone. You can't help but come away from it amazed by the detail and totally amused by the artist's concept.

Muse Gallery

This fine art gallery, which just celebrated its one year anniversary, is a showcase for works by such prominent artists as Bonnie Teitelbaum, Barbara Krupp, Katherine Adkins and others of national reputation. Upon entering, a massive piece by Bonnie Teitelbaum immediately caught my eye. Having seen her amazing abstract works in a gallery in Santa Fe a few years ago, I was thrilled to have the chance to see more work by this artist at Muse. The depth she manages to achieve using clear resins and mediums is nothing short of amazing, and I couldn't help but stand there in front of this magnificent painting in total awe. I could hardly bear to tear myself away from it, but there were additional works to see.

Among them were truly beautiful sculptures of the female form by Atlanta artist Chad Awalt, who brings forth his figures from downed trees. Polished and sculpted into works that are at once graceful and earthy, each reveals the unique inner patterns of the wood from which it was created. His works spoke to me on many levels, and if I could wave a magic wand, I'd have one of them on a pedestal in an expansive home suited to the display of such impressive pieces. But, returning to the reality of living in a cottage, I'll just have to own one of Mr. Awalt's unforgettable sculptures in my dreams.

One of the first things you'll notice as you enter Muse Gallery is the warm greeting you'll receive from owner Hali Lookabaugh. Hali firmly believes that haughtiness has no place in her gallery. She welcomes all who enter with a smile and freely shares her extensive knowledge of fine art whenever it's sought, while allowing visitors plenty of space to take in and appreciate the art on display without interference. Visiting her gallery is a very comfortable experience, which is, ideally, how visiting an art gallery should be for everyone.

Muse Gallery is located at 65 Arrow Rd. If you enjoy contemporary and abstract works, this gallery is a definite must-see!

In my next post, we'll explore the galleries in Bluffton, a quaint and artsy hamlet just a short drive from Hilton Head. Stay tuned!

Text and images ©2016 Lynn Edwards

Sunday, June 12, 2016

A Thought for Sunday, June 12, 2016

“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” -- Leonardo Da Vinci